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I’m always talking about a mental fitness plan; a daily guide that helps you build your life in a way that supports your ability to be your best self. Every family member in my house has one that is uniquely designed to their age, schedule and mental fitness needs. Although they are somewhat different, there are components that are the same. For example, eating healthy, positive affirmations, regular exercise, prayer and scheduling time for positivity are included on all of our plans.

Our scheduled time for positivity is very important because oftentimes, many people aren’t intentional about training their brains to think positively. It’s something that we assume automatically happens and we don’t have to work at it all. When the fact is, our brains are actually wired to do the exact opposite; think negatively. For some reason, it’s easier to think, assume or hang on to the negative than it is to the positive. But, we can change this by actually scheduling time to think and feel positively until it becomes automatic. In our family, we call this our READ, WATCH OR LISTEN time. During this time and for about 20 minutes or so, we have to read, watch and/or listen to something that makes us laugh, inspires us or makes us feel better about ourselves in some way. It can be an inspirational video that inspires you, your favorite show on Netflix that makes you laugh, a song that empowers you, a TedTalk that motivates you or an excerpt from a self-improvement book that encourages you. It helps to remind us to stay positive and allows our brain to receive new signals that eventually become easier and easier for the brain to receive. There is enormous power in positivity and the brain is a remarkable thing. You’d be so surprised at what it can achieve when YOU give it directions!

Be Well,

Kela

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Kela Price is the founder of Let's Get Mentally Fit and a wife and mother of 2. She is also a former marketing executive who became fascinated with psychology after battling postpartum depression. Currently, she is a graduate student pursuing a master's of science in psychology.